Software Overview

DLSuperC is a relatively, simple compare program to use and deliberately aimed at the single file pair text line processing. DLSuperC contains most of the basic components for the entire line of the DLSuperC family and could serve most users’ text compare requirements. Many enhancements have been added since the program’s original introduction to make it a full featured “industrial grade” text compare program – mostly because of its input text filtering and the processing of file sizes greater than 64K lines. DLSuperC is an evolving vehicle extending its scope up to Win XP operations. Extensions for interactive large size lines (2000 + characters per line using the Nlbx Preference Option) allows the program to evolve to an even more advanced level. The complementary program DLSuperCTW tracks this capability and provides even more advanced functions with added word coloring and highlighting. DLSuperC implements a batch interface for execution from the command line or via a user program.
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DLSuperCX is a more complex program than DLSuperC. DLSuperCX aimed at the more complex task of comparing two complete file directories with one program invocation. However, DLSuperCX can also be configured to do a single text file pair processing as DLSuperC, resulting in the same output results. Many new additional features made to DLSuperC will probably not be introduced into DLSuperCX. DLSuperC, not DLSuperCX, should be considered the exclusive vehicle to be periodically extended with new functions as needed to answer new programmer productivity requirements – normally directed to individual paired file comparison. Yet, occasionally, a few new features which are unique to DLSuperCX will be introduced as productivity enhancements. See the separate topic “DLSuperC vs DLSuperCX” for DLSuperC and DLSuperCX differences.
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DLSuperCBF is similar to DLSuperCX but is aimed at comparing directory files at the binary-file level. DLSuperCBF should be faster and produce results expected of more traditional directory compare programs. The user is often tempted to try more ambitious line compares which attempts to find where inserted and deleted lines appear within two files rather that whether two files are equal in content and length. The processing overhead involved in the complete compare of a directory is significantly reduced when only file matching, not line matching, is involved. The advantage of comparing included subdirectories within the initial directories is an added feature found in few, if any, directory compare programs. File date stamping can, also, be used as a criteria whereby copied files with identical time stamps can be, optionally, assumed as equal thereby saving extra processing overhead. Several users have used DLSuperCBF to verify a newly created CD against the original version or source equivalent.
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DLSuperCTW is a recent addition to the DLSuperC family. It is an extension of DLSuperC that combines both line and word comparison. The default mode displays word changes with up to 2 additional lines positioned vertically under the referenced matched portion of the changed line. Changed lines are composed and displayed as up to 128 character length lines. Line wrapping results for long changed lines forming multiple continuation lines. This mode is excellent for text that has been reformatted, causing text to flow onto the next line. The newest Wcln option rivals the line compare mode of DLSuperC since it display text changes as colored words within the displayed changed line. This mode requires word matches to observe line ending boundaries and not flow onto adjacent lines. All text lines, matched or changed, are displayed as single lines up to 2000+ characters in length without the use of line composing or using continuation. Text (e.g. *.txt), script (e.g.*. html) as well as program text source files (e.g. *.pas, *.cpp) are excellent input files for DLSuperCTW to compare. The Wcln option comparison results should not be very different then expected from using DLSuperC. However, word compare has more granularity in detailing, and allows better visual location of where source changes appear in the changed lines. Up to 10 word separators can be defined as additional delimiters so that special tokens (i.e. “<“, “;”, “=”, etc) can be detected and not obscure the intervening matching character string.
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DLSuperCBT is similar to DLSuperC with one exception. It provides for comparing files at the byte level (versus a text line) while resynchronizing itself during byte mismatches. Most byte compare programs do not have the capability to do the resynchronization. The change report of DLSuperCBT is in the form of a hexadecimal line list with the printable characters shown of the same line of data. DLSuperCBT has several preference options. One option allows the user to do a part compare of a portion from two input files. DLSuperCBT is a special variation of DLSuperC that can be performed on all file types but it details differences at the lowest byte level.
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DLSuperCRV is also very much like DLSuperC but without input text filters. DLSuperCRV is designed to be a tool to be used, primarily, in a source library maintenance environment. It can generate both a “Delta” and an “Undelta” file. It, also, generates full lines of source in its delta output and has the added capability of processing Fixed Length Records (i.e., all data records are equal and no CR/LF is needed at the end of each fixed length record). DLSuperCRV has a batch mode processing capability almost identical to DLSuperCBT. The objective of the batch mode is to allow the user to prepare an input file, which defines a stream of individual jobs to do a set of library compare operations.
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